Wholesale only in 2017

Wholesale only in 2017

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FENNEL
Latin name: Foeniculum vulgare
Family name: Apiaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Folate, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Most fennel bulbs are sold with the stalk still attached, so they will need to be removed before preparation. After removing the stalks, slice off the top and bottom of the fennel bulb. The outermost layer of the bulb should also be removed if the bulb is large or if its skin is bruised or split.
Cooking: The crisp and slightly sweet bulb is particularly pleasant served raw in salads. Whether braised, sautéed, roasted, or grilled, the bulb mellows and softens with cooking.
Storage: Wrap fennel head in plastic wrap and keep in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Fennel will keep for five to seven days in the refrigerator.

GARLIC
Latin name: Allium sativum
Family name: Alliaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Calcium, Phosphorus and Selenium, and a very good source of Vitamin C, Vitamin B6 and Manganese.
Preparation: The easiest way to crush garlic cloves is with a garlic crusher. If you do not have one, crush the garlic (skin on) by pressing the flat side of your knife handle against the clove, using the heel of your hand for pressure.
Cooking: Believe it or not, one raw garlic clove, finely minced or pressed releases more flavor than a dozen cooked whole cloves. Cooked, whole, unpierced cloves barely have any aroma at all, while raw garlic is the strongest in flavor.
Storage: Store unpeeled garlic in an open container in a cool, dry place away from other foods. Do not refrigerate or freeze unpeeled garlic.

KALE
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Thiamin, Riboflavin, Folate, Iron and Magnesium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Calcium, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: Wash kale well by dunking it in a bowl of tepid water several times and then rinsing under cold running water. Small kale leaves can be used whole. The larger leaves should be stripped or cut from the center rib.
Cooking: Traditional ways to prepare kale call for long cooking—about 40 minutes—until it is very soft. However, kale can also be boiled quickly, about 5 to 8 minutes, until it is just slightly crunchy.
Storage: Store kale in a perforated plastic bag in the vegetable crisper and use it within a few days.

KOHLRABI
Latin name: Brassica oleracea
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Folate, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: Tender, young kohlrabi is delicious eaten raw. Peel the outer skin with a paring knife.
Cooking: Kohlrabi can also be steamed or boiled. For this preparation don’t peel until after they are cooked. Steam or boil until bulbs are tender, peel skin, and season with butter, salt, and pepper, a cheese sauce, or just enjoy plain.
Storage: If the kohlrabi leaves are still attached to the bulb, trim them and store separately. If the leaves are in good shape—firm and green—they can be cooked but will need to be used within a couple of days. The bulbs should be stored, unwashed, in a plastic bag. They will hold for about a week in the refrigerator

LEEK
Latin name: Allium ampeloprasum
Family name: Alliaceae
Nutrition value: Low in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. High in Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Folate, Manganese, Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Iron and Magnesium
Preparation: To prepare leeks to be sliced or chopped, trim off the root end and about 1/4 inch of the white base. Remove any ragged, coarse outer leaves and discard. Trim each of the darkest portion of the leaves down to the light green, more tender portion, leaving about 2 inches of green. The dark green trimmed leaves can be reserved for other uses.
Cooking: Leeks can be steamed or boiled and then added to your recipe, or fry sliced leeks gently in butter for a minute or so and then cover with a lid to sweat so they cook without browning. Unlike onions, leeks shouldn't be allowed to brown; they become tough and unappetizing.
Storage: Leeks will exude an aroma that can be absorbed by other things in your refrigerator, so to store them before cooking, lightly wrap them in plastic wrap to contain the odor and moisture. Do not trim or wash before storing. Store in the vegetable drawer of your refrigerator.

LETTUCE
Latin name: Lactuca sativa
Family name: Asteraceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat and Sodium, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Thiamin, Folate, Iron, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Basic preparation consists of cleaning and drying. Some need to be cut or broken into smaller pieces before serving. Loose greens should have the damaged, wilted or yellowed leaves removed and the remaining greens should be soaked in cold water and drained.
Cooking: Lettuce is typically eaten raw with a favorite salad dressing & toppings or as a topping for a sandwich.
Storage: To store lettuce, wash the lettuce and dry the leaves with paper towels, seal or wrap it securely in plastic and place it in the coolest part of the refrigerator, which is generally located in the rear and lowest shelf section of the refrigerator.

ONION
Latin name: Allium cepa
Family name: Alliaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Folate, Potassium and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin C.
Preparation: Cut and discard each end of the onion. Peel the skin and it's ready to be eaten raw or cooked.
Cooking: he uses for onions are practically endless, except for desserts, of course. Onions are most often used to enhance flavors in such recipes as pizza, soup, stew and casseroles.
Storage: Onions can be stored at room temperature or placed in the refrigerator, for longer storage. Chilled onions thwart off the effects of sulfuric compounds that are likely responsible for causing your tears.

PARSNIP
Latin name: Pastinaca sativa
Family name: Apiaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Potassium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Folate and Manganese. It is high in sodium.
Preparation: Wash in cold water Cut off the stem end and straggling roots if present. Peel older parsnips or simply scrub or scrape young specimens. Parsnips are best eaten cooked.
Cooking: Parsnips can be cooked in a number of ways and each of them is as tasty as the other. It has a great veggie taste and can also be eaten raw as a salad.
Storage: In a cool, dry, dark place for up to 5 days or in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Remove any leaves attached to parsnips before storing for any length of time.

PEA, SNAP
Latin name: Pisum sativum
Family name: Fabaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Potassium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Thiamin, Folate, Iron and Manganese.
Preparation: Snap the top of the pod off and pull down to remove the string from the seam. Split the pod open by pressing on both sides of the seam with thumbs and pop out the peas.
Cooking: Peas fresh from the shell are a treasure. Available only for a brief period in late spring, they should be cooked simply and savored for their sweet freshness.
Storage: Place them in a container that is not airtight or place them in a perforated plastic bag. They can be refrigerated for 3 or 4 days. The longer they are refrigerated the less sweet they will be. Do not leave peas out at room temperature.

PEA, SNOW
Latin name: Pisum sativum
Family name: Fabaceae
Nutrition value: Snow peas provide vitamins A and C, iron and potassium. They are low in sodium. A 3 ounce serving, cooked and drained, contains 43 calories.
Preparation: To prepare snow peas snap off both ends with your fingers or trim them off with a small knife. Sugar snap peas generally just need the stem end of the pod snapped off. The strings on the pod peas are not noticeable, so it is not necessary to remove them. You may find a few strings come off when snapping the end, so go ahead and remove them if the string comes off.
Cooking: Stir-frying is a common method of cooking snow peas. Snow peas cook very quickly so if they are being stir-fried with other ingredients, they should be added at the end of the stir-frying process
Storage: Use as soon as possible, or store in a plastic bag, refrigerated for up to three days.

PEPPER, HOT
Latin name: Capsicum annuum
Family name: Solanaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Folate, Iron, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: When preparing hot peppers, use caution not to touch the eyes or similar areas that can be painfully affected by the capsaicin that rubs off on hands. Wearing rubber gloves is recommended as well as washing hands immediately after removing the gloves.
Cooking:
Storage: Fresh peppers are best stored in a refrigerator while dried peppers are best kept in dry, dark cool storage areas.

PEPPER, SWEET
Latin name: Capsicum annuum
Family name: Solanaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Niacin, Folate, Magnesium and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Remove the stem, seeds and ribs before eating.
Cooking:
Storage: They can be stored for at least a week if placed in a plastic bag and kept in the refrigerator. The riper the pepper is when harvested, the less time it will maintain its freshness.

POTATO
Latin name: Solanum tuberosum
Family name: Solanaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, and a very good source of Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Iron, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: The skin of a potato is edible, so the potato can be prepared with the skins on or with the skins off. Whether the skins are peeled off or left on will depend on personal preference, the type of dish they are being prepared for and the preparation instructions that are called for in the recipe.
Cooking: Potatoes are prepared in many ways: skin-on or peeled, whole or cut up, with seasonings or without. The only requirement involves cooking to break down the starch. Most potato dishes are served hot, but some are first cooked then served cold, notably potato salad and potato chips/crisps.
Storage: Store potatoes in a cool dry place. They will keep at room temperature for up to two weeks and longer when stored in cool temperatures. If potatoes are purchased in a plastic bag, remove them from the bag and place in a basket or other such type of a container so that they will have proper air circulation.

POTATO, SWEET
Latin name: Ipomoea batatas
Family name: Convolvulaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Potassium and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin A.
Preparation: To prepare sweet potatoes, scrub them well with a vegetable brush.
Cooking: The roots are most frequently boiled, fried, or baked. They can also be processed to make starch and a partial flour substitute.
Storage: Because cold can damage sweet potatoes, they should not be refrigerated but should be stored in a cool area—like a pantry—and used within two weeks.

RADICCHIO
Latin name: Cichorium intybus
Family name: Asteraceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Zinc, and a very good source of Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Folate, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: Cut off bases of radicchio heads; rinse and drain leaves.
Cooking: In Italy, where the vegetable is quite popular, it is usually eaten grilled in olive oil, or mixed into dishes such as risotto: in the United States it is gaining in popularity but is more often eaten raw in salads. As with all chicories, if grown correctly its roots can be used to mix with coffee. It can also be served with pasta, in strudel, as a poultry stuffing, or as part of a tapenade.
Storage: To store, wrap in plastic and place in the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator to keep fresh for two to three days.

RADISH
Latin name: Raphanus sativus
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: Radishes are rich in ascorbic acid, folic acid, and potassium. They are a good source of vitamin B6, riboflavin, magnesium, copper, and calcium. One cup of sliced red radish bulbs provides approximately 20 calories, largely from carbohydrates.
Preparation: Radishes are not usually peeled during preparation unless asked for in a recipe. Peeled radishes are milder in flavor than unpeeled radishes. To prepare a radish, simply slice off the roots and leaves, wash under cold running water, and drain. Depending on what a recipe calls for, radishes are served whole, sliced, diced, minced, and/or grated.
Cooking:The most commonly eaten portion is the napiform taproot, although the entire plant is edible and the tops can be used as a leaf vegetable. The bulb of the radish is usually eaten raw, although tougher specimens can be steamed.
Storage: Store without the leafy tops and place in the refrigerator to keep fresh for four to seven days if they are the spring varieties, or two to four weeks if they are winter radishes. The larger varieties, such as the watermelon, are similar to turnips for storing and can be kept longer or stored in a cool dry area.

RUTABAGA
Latin name: Brassica napobrassica
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Wash and peel rutabagas as you would a potato.
Cooking: Finns cook rutabagas in a variety of ways; roasted to be served with meat dishes, as the major ingredient in the ever popular Christmas dish Swede casserole ("lanttulaatikko"), as a major flavor enhancer in soups, uncooked and thinly julienned as a side dish or in a salad, baked, or boiled. Finns use rutabagas in most dishes that call for any root vegetable.
Storage: If stored between 32 to 35 degrees. F. and at a humidity near 90 percent rutabagas will keep for four to six months. Waxed roots will keep under refrigerator conditions for one to two months.

SCALLION
Latin name: Allium wakegi
Family name: Alliaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Sodium, and very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Riboflavin, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Leeks carry some dirt especially in between the layer of overlapping leaves. Begin cleaning by removing discolored leaves and trimming off green tops and root tips. Cut the leek lengthwise by inserting a knife from the base. Spread the leaves and rinse thoroughly. Placing the fanned out leaves in a bowl of water and gently moving the leaves will loosen any remaining dirt.
Cooking: They may be cooked or used raw, as a part of salads or Asian recipes. Diced scallions are used in soup, noodle and seafood dishes. To make many Eastern sauces, the bottom quarter-inch of scallions are commonly removed before use.
Storage: Scallions like cool moist conditions, as low as 32° F with high humidity.

 
SHALLOT
Latin name: Allium oschaninii
Family name: Alliaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Vitamin C, Folate and Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin B6 and Manganese.
Preparation: Shallots are peeled similarly to an onion. Slice off the ends of the shallot, and then grab a hold of the thin skin and peel it back. In most French cooking the shallots are chopped more finely then an onion.
Cooking: Although they are similar to an onion, there are some important differences in how shallots are used in French cooking. One or two shallots finely chopped are usually all that is needed to add a subtle, slightly sweet flavor to recipes. If your recipe calls for cooking the shallots in butter or oil, you should do so on a low temperature. Just like garlic, shallots can over cook easily. You want them to come out soft and slightly caramelized, not crunchy and bitter.
Storage: Store shallots in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place for up to 1 month.

 
SPINACH
Latin name: Spinacia oleracea
Family name: Amaranthaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin and Zinc, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
Preparation: Spinach should be rinsed under cold water in a colander.
Cooking: Spinach is wonderful raw, but you can cook it in a tightly covered pan, with just the water that clings to the leaves after rinsing, over medium-high heat just until soft, about 3 to 5 minutes.
Storage: Fresh spinach loses much of its nutritional value with storage of more than a few days. While refrigeration slows this effect to about eight days, spinach will lose most of its folate and carotenoid content, so for longer storage it is frozen, cooked and frozen, or canned. Storage in the freezer can be for up to eight months.

SQUASH, SUMMER
Latin name: Cucurbita pepo
Family name: Cucurbitaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Thiamin, Niacin, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Magnesium, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Thoroughly scrub each squash under running water until the skin feels clean. The cut off and discard the stem end and scrape off the other end. Only if the skin is unusually tough or the surface feels especially gritty after washing, is it necessary to peel the squash.
Cooking: Summer squash has a high water content and will sometimes need to be drained, otherwise the dish you are preparing may become too watery. Drain the squash by cutting it into slices, arranging them in a shallow dish, and sprinkling with salt. After 20 to 30 minutes, rinse the slices under cold running water and pat dry.
Storage: Handle summer squash with care because they are damaged very easily. They can be stored for four to five days if placed in a perforated plastic bag and placed in the refrigerator. Do not wash until ready to use.

SQUASH, WINTER
Latin name: Cucurbita pepo
Family name: Cucurbitaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Riboflavin, Folate, Magnesium and Copper, and a very good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Winter squash matures on the vine and develops an inedible, thick, hard rind and tough seeds.
Cooking: Great for puréeing, roasting and baking. Once squash is cooked and mashed, it can be used in soups, main dishes, vegetable side dishes, even breads, muffins, custards and pies.
Storage: Place whole winter squash on top of thick pads of newspapers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated location, preferably between 45 and 50 degrees F. Check on a regular basis for rot and use within three to six months depending on variety of squash.

TOMATILLO
Latin name: Physalis philadelphica
Family name: Solanaceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Niacin, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Remove husks and wash tomatillos. Remove skins if desired. Cook tomatillos either whole or cut in small pieces.
Cooking: Tomatillos can by very inconsisten in flavor, with some being sour and others tasting mild and sweet. If the tomatillos are to tart for your taste, try adding a little sugar to balance the taste.
Storage: Fresh ripe tomatillos will keep in the refrigerator for about two weeks. They will keep even longer if the husks are removed and the fruits are placed in sealed plastic bags stored in the refrigerator. They may also be frozen whole or sliced.

TOMATO, CHERRY
Latin name: Solanum lycopersicum
Family name: Solanceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Sodium, and very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Wash it thoroughly before eating or cooking.
Cooking: Though easy to toss in salads or eat right off the vine, cherry tomatoes have far more mouthwatering culinary applications. From playing the dominant role in salsa to being the tantalizing and colorful component of a tart, cherry tomatoes can be an inspiring ingredient for many delicious dishes.
Storage: Keep unrefrigerated and out of sunlight., as they will quickly lose flavor, nutrients and freshness.

TOMATO, PLUM
Latin name: Solanum lycopersicum
Family name: Solanceae
Nutrition value: This food is low in Sodium, and very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Magnesium, Phosphorus and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Potassium and Manganese.
Preparation: Wash it thoroughly before eating or cooking.
Cooking: Its higher solid content is good for making tomato sauce and paste.
Storage: Keep unrefrigerated and out of sunlight., as they will quickly lose flavor, nutrients and freshness.

TURNIP
Latin name: Brassica rapa
Family name: Brassicaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Potassium and Copper, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C and Manganese.
Preparation: Parsnips are usually peeled or scrubbed, and unlike their orange lookalikes, carrots, are almost always eaten cooked.
Cooking: Baking, steaming and microwaving are also excellent preparation methods, and don't overlook the possibility of small chunks, slices, or julienne strips of parsnips quickly sautéed. However you choose to prepare parsnips, try not to over cook them, because they are usually tastiest when they are just slightly tender.
Storage: The greens will draw moisture from the turnip root, so remove them immediately. Stored separately in a plastic bag, the greens will last three or four days.

WATERMELON
Latin name: Citrullus lanatus
Family name: Cucurbitaceae
Nutrition value: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C.
Preparation: Watermelon should be handled gently to avoid internal bruising. Before cutting into a watermelon, your hands and the watermelon should be washed to avoid bacterial contamination.
Storage: Cut watermelon can be refrigerated up to 7 days but should be kept in an airtight container. Uncut watermelon can last up to 21 days.